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Garments you can make using this technology:

Features:

  • Sewing the cups for large size bust: US 12, EU-44 and larger (bust circumference 100+ cm ).
  • Sewing on the boning on the inner corset (of the dress).
  • Sewing a dress with a falling skirt.
  • One shoulder strap dress.

Skills you gain:

  • Calculation and alteration of the plus-size patterns: US 12, EU-44 and larger (bust circumference 100+ cm ).
  • Forming slim, proportionate silhouette with the inner corset and the cutting of the lining.
  • Construction of the pattern for the asymmetry dress – strap on one shoulder.
  • The purpose  of the straps for the dresses with bust circumference 100+ cm.
  • Inserting zipper into a knitting skirt and non-elastic lining, and to make a transition to the lacing.
  • Drapery of the bodice with inclined ordered folds, and drapery of the belt.
  • Applique and  rhinestones decoration.

Where to use:

  • Sewing wedding and evening dresses for non-standard body type.

Author: Tatiana Kozorovitsky

Total length: 4h 25m

Tutorial 1. Taking Measurements.

First of all I would like to show you how to take measurements off your client.

Bust front: my measuring tape looks somewhat inclined because I had to pose before the camera. Try to place your measuring tape strictly horizontally.

Under-bust front: try to measure it strictly from side seam to side seam. Use the seams on your client’s clothes as guidelines.

You can take additional measurements off a full-figured woman:

- Waistline front (again, take it from side seam to side seam),

- Stomach front,

- And hips front.

These additional measurements allow you to control the balance of the garment – in other words, put the front part of the garment precisely in place by determining the location of the side seams.

Classic bust circumference measurement: make sure your measuring tape is strictly horizontal. The look of the entire garment depends on how accurate your measurements are.

Under-bust circumference:

Waist circumference: you can pull the measuring tape tighter and check to what extent you can restrict your client's waist (it may not even be necessary in some cases).

Stomach circumference: I'm taking rough measurements but you must try to pass right along the cord when taking measurements off your client.

Remember to record the distance from the waistline to the cord.

Hip circumference: you can place your finger under the measuring tape to account for the stomach.

And again, make sure to record the distance from the waistline. It will truly come in handy when you start working on the contour of the side seam on the skirt.

Next you just decide on the placement of princess seams and check if it's going to look good on this particular client. Once you have made up your mind about the princess seams, take the bust middle measurement.

You need to somehow mark the bust apex: either with chalk or with a pin. The clip measurement, which plays a very important role in pattern building, is taken from this very point.

- Towards the armscye.


- Towards the corner.


- Towards the neckline. Think over the best way to shape the neckline. At this stage, it makes sense to ask how much your client wants to reveal.

Mark the shoulder seam and take the neck base to bust middle measurement. You are supposed to reach the point from which you started to take the bust middle measurement.

Find the beginning of the arm (i.e. the end of the shoulder seam) and take the shoulder tip to bust middle measurement by turning the measuring tape.

Measure the length of the shoulder from the base of the neck to the beginning of the arm. Next, take measure the distance from shoulder to elbow and from shoulder to wrist.




Armscye circumference. Guide yourself after the point where the shoulder ends.

Upper arm circumference:

Elbow circumference. You can ask your client to slightly bend her arm.

Wrist circumference:

Forearm circumference: it is only relevant if you plan to add long sleeves sewn with non-resilient fabric, to make sure they aren't too tight.

Side length: find the desired level of the top edge of your corset and measure the side length down from it.

Corset length: find the level of the hip joint where the leg bends. That level is the longest your corset can be. You can make it shorter but by no means longer than that.

Shoulder width at the front: measure from the very end of one shoulder seam to the end of the opposite shoulder seam, right along the shoulder line.

Front width: this measurement is taken from armscye to armscye and relevant only for high-neck dresses. It is hardly ever used in dresses with low necklines. This measurement, however, can still come in handy if the neckline is not very low and the garment features shoulder seams.

Shoulder width at the back: front and back shoulder width measurements indicate the degree of shoulder droop.

I find the armscye areas at the back and take the back width measurement.

Between shoulder straps: simply feel for the straps of your client's bra and measure the distance in-between.

Back corners height: look at the person and determine the best way to place the corners.

Nape to waist: measure from the sevenths cervical vertebra to the waistline.

Back shoulder to waist: measure right from the shoulder seam.

Back shoulder slope: bring the measuring tape from the waistline to the end of the shoulder seam.

You can also measure the length of the corset at the back.

Find the shoulder blade and measure the distance from its bottom edge to the waistline. It will also mark the top edge of the corset if you don't intend to add corners for attaching shoulder straps.

Upper arm fullness: ask your client to slightly bend her arm and determine the correct placement of the armscye for setting in the sleeve. This way you can make sure the arm will be able to move freely.

Garment length:


Tutorial 1. Taking Measurements.

First of all I would like to show you how to take measurements off your client. 

Bust front: my measuring tape looks somewhat inclined because I had to pose before the camera. Try to place your measuring tape strictly horizontally.

Under-bust front: try to measure it strictly from side seam to side seam. Use the seams on your client’s clothes as guidelines.

You can take additional measurements off a full-figured woman:

- Waistline front (again, take it from side seam to side seam), 

- Stomach front,

- And hips front.  

These additional measurements allow you to control the balance of the garment – in other words, put the front part of the garment precisely in place by determining the location of the side seams.

Classic bust circumference measurement:  make sure your measuring tape is strictly horizontal. The look of the entire garment depends on how accurate your measurements are.

Under-bust circumference:

Waist circumference: you can pull the measuring tape tighter and check to what extent you can restrict your client's waist (it may not even be necessary in some cases).

Stomach circumference: I'm taking rough measurements but you must try to pass right along the cord when taking measurements off your client.

Remember to record the distance from the waistline to the cord.

Hip circumference: you can place your finger under the measuring tape to account for the stomach. 

And again, make sure to record the distance from the waistline. It will truly come in handy when you start working on the contour of the side seam on the skirt.

Next you just decide on the placement of princess seams and check if it's going to look good on this particular client. Once you have made up your mind about the princess seams, take the bust middle measurement.

You need to somehow mark the bust apex: either with chalk or with a pin. The clip measurement, which plays a very important role in pattern building, is taken from this very point. 

- Towards the armscye.


- Towards the corner.


- Towards the neckline. Think over the best way to shape the neckline. At this stage, it makes sense to ask how much your client wants to reveal.

Mark the shoulder seam and take the neck base to bust middle measurement. You are supposed to reach the point from which you started to take the bust middle measurement.

Find the beginning of the arm (i.e. the end of the shoulder seam) and take the shoulder tip to bust middle measurement by turning the measuring tape.

Measure the length of the shoulder from the base of the neck to the beginning of the arm. Next, take measure the distance from shoulder to elbow and from shoulder to wrist.




Armscye circumference. Guide yourself after the point where the shoulder ends. 

Upper arm circumference:

Elbow circumference. You can ask your client to slightly bend her arm.

Wrist circumference:

Forearm circumference: it is only relevant if you plan to add long sleeves sewn with non-resilient fabric, to make sure they aren't too tight.

Side length: find the desired level of the top edge of your corset and measure the side length down from it.

Corset length: find the level of the hip joint where the leg bends. That level is the longest your corset can be. You can make it shorter but by no means longer than that.

Shoulder width at the front: measure from the very end of one shoulder seam to the end of the opposite shoulder seam, right along the shoulder line. 

Front width: this measurement is taken from armscye to armscye and relevant only for high-neck dresses. It is hardly ever used in dresses with low necklines. This measurement, however, can still come in handy if the neckline is not very low and the garment features shoulder seams.

Shoulder width at the back: front and back shoulder width measurements indicate the degree of shoulder droop.

I find the armscye areas at the back and take the back width measurement.

Between shoulder straps: simply feel for the straps of your client's bra and measure the distance in-between.

Back corners height: look at the person and determine the best way to place the corners.

Nape to waist: measure from the sevenths cervical vertebra to the waistline.

Back shoulder to waist: measure right from the shoulder seam. 

Back shoulder slope: bring the measuring tape from the waistline to the end of the shoulder seam.

You can also measure the length of the corset at the back.

Find the shoulder blade and measure the distance from its bottom edge to the waistline. It will also mark the top edge of the corset if you don't intend to add corners for attaching shoulder straps.

Upper arm fullness: ask your client to slightly bend her arm and determine the correct placement of the armscye for setting in the sleeve. This way you can make sure the arm will be able to move freely.

Garment length:


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