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Garments you can make using this technology:

Features:

  • Corset form and quilted curvy cup constructing;
  • Classic and basic technology for making corset for medium (plastic bones) and strong (steel bones) waist reduction;

Skills you gain:

  • Marking bone location;
  • Sewing together curvy corset parts;
  • Sewing quilted cups;
  • Ironing and steaming the right way to form it.

Where to use:

  • Perfect for sewing wedding dresses with different decorations: drapery, applique, embroidery;
  • Garments made with this technology are suitable for any body type and size;
  • Great for reshaping silhouettes and creating proportional forms.

 

Author: Tatiana Kozorovitsky

Total length: 4h 25m

Tutorial 3.  Fusing the Pieces of the Lining.

In this tutorial I am going to fuse the lining pieces.

I put the medium piece of the corset front onto the pressboard and unpin it:

I take off the lining pieces cut out of batiste and main lining fabric.

The fused pieces of the front crepe part remain on the pressboard:

I place the batiste carefully over the crepe pieces its adhesive layer up:

I put 2 crepe-satin pieces of the lining on top and even out cut edges very carefully:


And finally I put the second batiste piece on top of it with the adhesive layer down:

I fasten the iron-on material by stamping it carefully with the iron:

Then I remove the face pieces and finish pressing the lining pieces:


No matter how accurately I arrange the fabric, it still goes beyond the iron-on material by some 1-2 mm because the fabric does get deformed during the pressing process and the fusing of batiste:

So I still need to shape these areas:

This procedure demonstrates how hard it is to fuse pieces that have been individually cut out of iron-on material. That is why I highly recommend you fusing the fabric beforehand and only afterwards going on to the cutting.

However there are situations when fusing all fabric in advance is impossible which is why I have shown you what to do in a case like this.

Then and there I have explained and demonstrated you the principle of fusing a corset.

It is a “sandwich” principle. I place the pieces that need fusing onto the pieces that match the pattern best.

I repeat the same with the rest of the cut-out corset pieces.

The side pieces of the front:

I reach the central piece of the front.

At first I go through the same steps that were made for other corset pieces.

But I have cut out a separate piece of hard iron-on fabric for some extra supporting effect in the cup area.

And I do the following:

I put a cup piece made of the hard iron-on material over the lining piece with its adhesive layer down:

I press it a little:

Next I shape the fused pieces:

I trim the hard iron-on material along the seam allowance line:

And I press the hard iron-on material one more time through:

This is what the central piece of the lining of the front looks like when the cup piece of the iron-on material is fused onto it:


And again I take 2 medium front pieces of the lining and place the cup supporting pieces of hard iron-on material on top of them with their adhesive layer down:

I press the hard iron-on material through:

I shape the pieces:

I restore the notches that have been covered with the hard iron-on material:

And I repeat the same steps for the pieces of the side part of the back:


I fuse the lining pieces of the central part of the back:

Marking the Location of Bones.

I have finished fusing all lining pieces and fused some hard iron-on fabric onto the cups.

Now I start marking the location of bones.

Central Piece of the Front.

I start with the lining piece of the central part of the front.

I make preparatory markings on the fabric (blue pecked lines):

Here is the sequence of the working process:

1. I join the notches of the bust line using a ruler (line A-B).

2. I find the middle of the A-B section (point A1).

3. I join the notches of the waistline using a ruler (line C-D).

4. I find the middle of the C-D section (point C1).

5. I draw a line connecting points A1 and C1.

6. I make 2 parallel lines G-H and J-K at a distance of 0.8 inches from each side of the A1-C1 line.

7. I mark points E1 and E2 at a 0.8 gap from the edge of the piece.

8. I draw 2 parallel lines N-P and L-M stepping 1.4-1.6 inches down and 1.2 inches up the A-B line.

9. The A1-C1 line divides the neckline curve in half. I divide each half of the curve one more time marking points F1 and F2.

10. I join points E1 and E2 along the curve repeating the bottom edge of the hard iron-on fabric.

The marking is finished.

Please take a look at how I’m going to sew-on bones according to my markings:

There are going to be 10 bones in total sewn onto the front piece (their numbers are written in red).

Bone 1: it goes along the A1-C1 line. This is a central vertical bone.

Bone 2: it goes along the A-B bust-line.

This is a central horizontal bone or a chest bone. It goes along the bust-line of the left medium piece of the front, continues along the bust-line of the central piece of the front and then along the bust-line of the right medium piece of the front.

Bones 3 and 4: they go along the G-H and J-K lines.

These are additional vertical bones for supporting the central piece of the front. However the central piece of the front of my corset is rather narrow. And that is why I have not decided yet whether or not some additional bones, parallel to the central bone, are required. I mark the location of these bones just in case and will make the final decision later during the sewing process.

Bones 5 and 6: they are sewn between the points E1-F1 and E2-F2. These are inner bones of the cup.

Bone 7: it goes along the N-P line parallel to the central chest bone.

Same as the central chest bone this bone goes along the bust-line of the left medium piece of the front, along the bust-line of the central piece of the front and along the bust-line of the right medium piece of the front.

Bone 8: it goes along the L-M line.

It starts at the central piece of the front and goes over to the left medium piece of the front.

Bone 9: it goes along the L-M line.

It starts at the central piece of the front and goes over to the right medium piece of the front.

Bone 10: it goes along the bottom (base line) of the cup that I’m going to quilt and goes over to the left and right medium pieces of the front.

The inner bones of the cup create and maintain its shape making it look round and embossed.

Medium Pieces of the Front.

I go through the same steps for the medium pieces of the front.

I make some preparatory marking on the fabric (blue pecked lines):

Here is the sequence of the working process:

1. I join the notches of the bust-line using a ruler (line A-A2).

2. The A-A2 Line is an extension of the A-B line on the central piece of the front.

3. Point A is the general point of all these pieces.

4. I mark point E1 leaving a 0.8 inch gap from the edge of the piece.

5. This point should lie at the same level with the E1 point on the central piece of the front.

6. Now I need to decide where will be the border or the base line of the cup I’m going to quilt. I need to determine the intersection of the cup base line and the bust-line, i.e. determine point R.

The base line of the round cup begins about 2-2.4 inches off the side of the corset.

I place a corresponding side piece to this medium piece of the front:

Description: E:\Corset Academy\FINISHED\English\AK 1\mp4\Corset 1\Transcript\tut (book)_files\image420.jpg

If you don’t take the seam allowances of the side piece of the front into account, you are going to have about 0.8-1.2 inches left at the bust-line level of this piece.

Therefore I need to mark the remaining 0.8-1.2 inches off the seam allowance of the medium piece of the front in order to determine the intersection of the cup base line and the bust-line (point R).

Let me draw the location of the base line of the cup. It is going to be a curve going through points R and E1.

It is very easy to mark the base line of the cup (the curve): I just place my fist onto the bust-line, mark the radius with a pencil and draw a curve connecting points R and E1 by moving my hand:

The curve connecting points R and E1 is an extension of the curve connecting points E1 and E2 on the central piece of the front.

7. Now I find the culmination point of the hard iron-on material (point F3).

8. I draw a line connecting points E1 and F3.

9. I mark points N and L stepping 1.4-1.6 inches down and 1.2 inches up the A-A2 line. I used exactly the same values for the A-B line on the central piece of the front.

10. I draw a line N-N1 - not parallel to line A-A2 but at a slight downward angle.

Line N-N1 is an extension of line N-P on the central piece of the front.

Point N is the general point of these pieces.

11. I draw a line L-L1 - also not parallel to the A-A2 line but at a slight upward angle.

Line L-L1 is an extension of line L-M on the central piece of the front.

Point L is a general point of these pieces.

12. I draw a line C2-C3 dividing the bottom part of the medium front piece in about a half.

The marking is finished.

Please take a look at how I am going to sew bones onto the left medium piece of the front:

Bone 2: it goes along the A-A2 bust-line.

This is a central horizontal or a chest bone. It goes along the bust-line of the left medium piece of the front, continues along the bust-line of the central piece of the front and then along the bust-line of the right medium piece of the front.

Bone 7: it goes along line N-N1 at a slight angle downwards to the central chest bone.

Same as the central chest bone this bone goes this bone goes along the left medium piece of the front, along the central piece of the front and along the right medium piece of the front.

Bone 8: it goes along line L-L1.

It begins at the central piece of the front and goes over to the left medium piece of the front.

Bone 10:  it goes along the bottom (base line) of the cup which I am going to quilt and then goes over to the central part of the front and the right medium piece of the front.

Bone 11: it is an inner bone going along lines E1 and F3.

Bone 12: it is a vertical bone going along line C2-C3.

This is what the marking for quilting rounded cups with bones looks like.

Please note the way quilted bones will pass from the central part of the front onto the left side part of the front:


I repeat the same steps for the right half of the medium piece of the corset front.

I think there is no need for detailed explanations this time.

All the marking is done in a mirrored way:

Bones 2, 7, 9 and 10 pass onto the central piece of the front.

Bones 13 and 14 remain only on this piece.

Side Pieces of the Front.

I mark the location of bones on the side pieces of the front.

I draw a line on both pieces going along the middle of the waistline lengthwise to the whole piece - almost parallel to the cut edge line.

Description: E:\Corset Academy\FINISHED\English\AK 1\mp4\Corset 1\Transcript\tut (book)_files\image430.jpg

Description: E:\Corset Academy\FINISHED\English\AK 1\mp4\Corset 1\Transcript\tut (book)_files\image432.jpg

Side Pieces of the Back.

I mark the location of bones on the side pieces of the back.

My corset is rather small-sized which is why I am going to put one vertical bone onto each piece about in the middle of it.

If the corset were large-sized I would have divided the width of the piece into 3 sections and put 2 vertical bones onto each section.

Central Pieces of the Back.

There is no need for additional bones on the central pieces of the back because there will be some bones for the lacing.

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